Cupcake Delight Mini Pillow | New Crochet Pattern

(See updated version here! When purchasing a PDF copy of this pattern you will receive the updated pattern!)

After continual coaxing and suggestions, my sister finally convinced me to make a cupcake themed project. The fact of the matter is not that I never wanted to, only that I just didn’t have the inspiration or the time for one. Well, she has won out. And I must say, I am pleased with the results. Of course, I think she is more pleased.

So to top off this mini pillow rampage of mine, let me proudly present to you my Cupcake Delight Mini Pillow! Read on for free crochet pattern. 

(Note that I will have a PDF version of the pattern available for purchase at Ravelry and Etsy very soon! And in case you are interested in purchasing the actual pillow, I will have a listing up on Etsy for that as well.)

So far I have made four mini pillows, three with cotton yarn and one with acrylic. I chose cotton because I wanted a sturdy pillow that wouldn’t fray, pill, or stretch out of shape. I love using natural fibers so much more than acrylic, but sometimes you have to take affordability into account. Actually, people like me always have to take affordability into account. 
The first pillow I made was with cotton yarn and I have had it for many years now. I am very happy to say that it still looks great, no stretching or pilling, even though it has seen much use. Granted, the brand of cotton yarn will have something to say about this matter, but I definitely recommend cotton for pillows. And yet there is one thing to keep in mind. My family all agreed that the acrylic pillow was softer and thus more appealing to snuggle while the cotton ones are less so, but they quickly added the fact that the cotton will most likely last longer and look good as well. Just something to keep in mind.
Now for the pattern!

Cupcake Delight Mini Pillow

Skill Level easy
Finished Size 10” (25.5 cm) square
Materials
Medium Weight Yarn (I used Peaches N’ Cream)
  Yardage: 200 yards of color A (white)(I bought a cone, which meant 700 yards!), 15 yard of color B   (light pink), 15 yards of color C (light green), 1 yard of color D (red), and scraps of extra for french     knots
Crochet Hook 7 (4.50 mm)
Yarn Needle for french knots
Polyester Fiberfill 
Fabric glue

Gauge
7 hdc = 2’’
5 rows = 2’’
Gauge Swatch: 2’’w x 2’’h (5 cm x 5 cm) ch 9.
Row 1: hdc in third ch from hook and in each ch across: 7 sc
Row 2 – 5: ch 2, turn, hdc in each hdc across: 4 sc
Finish off.
Frankly, I never give much mind to gauge since what I normally do doesn’t matter too much whether the sizing is the same as the designers. But I realize that some people prefer to check their gauge, and maybe that is the professional thing to do. I’m good with it.
You will start by making the pillow panels. But do not join the panels together until the very end. You will need to work the french knot embellishments into the top panel and if the two panels are joined, well, I just don’t see that working out for you.
PILLOW PANEL (make 2)
Round 1: with color A, make an adjustable ring, ch 2, 16 hdc in ring, sl st in first hdc: 16 hdc
Round 2: ch 2, turn, (hdc in next 3 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, sl st in first hdc: 24 hdc
Round 3: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 2 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 5 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 3 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 32 hdc
Round 4: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 5 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 7 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 2 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 40 hdc
Round 5: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 4 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 9 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 5 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 48 hdc
Round 6: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 7 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 11 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 4 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 56 hdc
Round 7: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 6 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 13 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 7 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 64 hdc
Round 8: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 9 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 15 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 6 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 72 hdc
Round 9: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 8 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 17 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 9 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 80 hdc
Round 10: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 11 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 19 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 8 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 88 hdc
Round 11: ch 2, turn, hdc in next 10 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc, (hdc in next 21 hdc, 3 hdc in next hdc) repeat around, hdc in last 11 hdc, sl st in first hdc: 96 hdc
Finish off.
Note that I changed the frosting pattern from what you see in the picture.
Set the panels aside and take your colored yarn to make the cupcake applique. I had a lot of fun mixed with trepidation over this applique. My first thoughts on how to make it, I am surprised to say, worked out as I had hoped.
I wanted the cupcake applique to look like a cupcake. To me, the most notable things about cupcakes, visually that is, is the ribbing on the cup and the swirl to the frosting. I wanted to design both aspects with these notable distinctions in mind. 
For the bottom, I chose to work in certain loops only, at times the back and when turning, the front, to create the ribbing. I will admit right now that I guessed at what stitches to use, with the thought of merely increasing and decreasing in height. It worked the first time! Don’t you just love when that happens?
For the top, the idea on how to achieve the swirl eventually worked as I had hoped but I was not as lucky as I was with the bottom and had to rip and try again too many times to count. I crocheted a long chain and worked a single row which was turned back on itself again and again and overlapped to create a haphazard-kind of swirl. Ingenious, right?! The first try turned out too long. Heavy on the frosting, huh. On a real cupcake, maybe, but not for this design. I subtracted a layer of stitches and was happy with the shorter frosting.
The cherry was simple, of course, but I debated on whether or not to add a stem. I think distraction made my mind up for me, because I didn’t add one.
CUPCAKE APPLIQUE
Cup
Row 1: with color B, ch 12, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 3 ch, hdc in next 3 ch, dc in last 4 ch: 11sts
Row 2: ch 3 (counts as dc), turn, in flo, dc in next 2 sts, hdc in next 4 sts, sc in last 4 sts: 11 sts
Row 3: ch 1, turn, in blo, sc in next 4 sts, hdc in next 4 sts, dc in last 3 sts: 11 sts
Row 4: ch 2, turn, hdc in each st across: 11 hdc
Row 5: ch 1, turn, in blo, sc in next 4 sts, hdc in next 4 sts, dc in last 3 sts: 11 sts
Row 6: ch 1, turn, in blo, sc in next 4 sts, hdc in next 4 sts, dc in last 3 sts: 11 sts
Row 7: ch 1, turn, sl st in next st, sc in next 3 sts, hdc in next 3 sts, dc in last 4 sts: 11sts
Sl st around evenly. Finish off.
Frosting
Row 1: with color C, ch 56, 2 dc in 3rd ch from hook, dc in next 11 ch, dc2tog 3 times, dc in next 10 ch, 2 dc in next 3 ch, dc in next 9 ch, dc2tog 3 times, dc in next 6 ch, dc2tog: 52 sts
Finish off.
Take the frosting you just crocheted and overlap it at each bend (i.e. each decrease or increase). I secured mine where I wanted it with stitch markers and began sewing each layer. Although I am fond of gluing my appliques, for reasons I will divulge later, in this situation I think it was better sewn.
Cherry
Round 1: make an adjustable ring, ch 1, 8 sc in ring, sl st in first sc: 8 sc
Finish off.
Once all the cupcake elements are made, sew or glue them together, then attach your finished cupcake applique to the panel you consider the front. 
Here is where I made my first mistake. I sometimes think my tendency toward fabric glue is really just another excuse for cutting corners, and this time I wanted to do it the original way and sew the applique on. So I did. (Or “sew, I did”, get it? Okay, never mind.) I continued with the rest of the pattern and guess what, I wasn’t happy with it. In fact, I wanted to cry. The applique looked smooshed onto the pillow, the pillow lacked pizzazz, and I even thought it wasn’t entirely centered. I tossed the abhorrence away for the remainder of the night and tried to forget about all the hard work I had done for nothing.
This morning, however, I was able to look upon the pillow with fresh eyes. Sewing the applique on may be the original method but I realized that by gluing the applique, you have a more clean cut looking piece, do you know what I mean? The stitches used to sew the applique on tended to meld the two layers together whereas the glue kept them as separate but joined elements. Am I describing this well?
Sprinkle Embellishments
Anyhow, now for the sprinkle embellishments. After attaching the applique, start adding french knots of all different colors to the area surrounding the applique. I used at least four different colors, but I can really go crazy with french knots. Do you know how to make a french knot? Don’t despair if you do not, it really is quite easy. Watch this video by Mary Corbet on how to make a french knot. If you are like me, you will quickly become addicted. And not to mention the art they create with this simple stitch!
Finishing the Pillow
Now that you have the front panel all decorated, you can join the two panels and add the stuffing. Another mistake I made was to join the panels with the same color yarn as they were made with. This gave it no border and was the next thing I changed this morning. I recommend using a contrasting yarn and single crocheting the panels together. But don’t forget to leave a gap open at the end for adding the fiberfill.
When it comes to stuffing, I always say, “If it looks full enough, then add some more.” This is a lesson I learned years ago when I sewed some pillows and later had flat, lifeless things. It may seem like enough, but by the time it gets hugged a little or laid on, it can become a little flatter than you expected. There’s always room for more! Once you have stuffed it sufficiently, finish single crocheting it shut. Weave in the ends and stand back to survey your handiwork.
What do you think? Is it a lovely cupcake pillow, or what? I’m sure my sister already has an inkling that this pillow is for her. But I wanted to be completely satisfied with it before giving it to her. It doesn’t pay to be hasty. At least, that’s what I keep reminding myself. Oh and hey! The good pictures on here were taken by her, Alissa Yarbrough! She does such beautiful work at product photography, don’t you agree?!
Come back soon to see my new mixed media project, a Valentine’s plaque!
This is an original pattern created and designed by Amy Yarbrough of Ginger Peachy. You are welcome to copy the pattern for personal use but do not sell the pattern, distribute, or reprint it. Feel free to share a link to the pattern. You can sell products made from this pattern but please credit me, Amy Yarbrough of Ginger Peachy. Do not mass produce or factory manufacture using my pattern. Thanks for respecting the wishes of the designer, and be sure to ask me if you have any questions regarding this copyright.
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